IDEAS schedule for December | CBC Radio

* Please note this schedule is subject to change.
 

Tuesday, December 1 

BRIDGING DIVIDES IN THE WAKE OF A GLOBAL PANDEMIC
The Coronavirus era will be remembered for revealing and exacerbating existing social fault lines: the growing gap between the haves and the have-nots, reversing hard-won gains for the poor and for women, and for fuelling fear of the “Other.” This widening set of divisions goes beyond our own neighbourhoods, cities and countries. The effect of these deepened divides are glaring on the global scale too, marking the experience of living through this pandemic in ways so stark, you can easily trace them on the world map. The 2020 Victoria Forum, jointly hosted by the University of Victoria and the Senate of Canada, convened a virtual gathering of more than 1,300 policy makers, academics, business leaders and civil society to ask the question: how to bridge the divides in the wake of a pandemic? 

Wednesday, December 2

URSULA FRAKLIN, PART ONE
Before iPads and Playstations, before AI medicine and laser weaponry, there was The Real World of Technology. In these acclaimed 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, the pioneering scientist and renowned humanitarian Ursula Franklin defines technology simply as “practice, the way we do things around here.” By reflecting deeply and clearly on how that practice has changed over time, she reveals much about the ways technology imposes itself on how we live and work.

Thursday, December 3

TBD

Friday, December 4

DANGEROUS KITCHEN, PART ONE
In 1992, producer Philip Coulter took a team to Los Angeles to interview the famous — and notorious — musician Frank Zappa for a series about ‘How Music Works.’ Zappa was very ill at the time (he died the following year), and there wasn’t enough in the interviews for the series as planned. Ten years later, Philip went back to LA to complete the project, interviewing musicians and others who had worked with Zappa, and to explore a different question — how did this prolific, iconoclastic and ever-inventive composer and musician actually go about creating his groundbreaking music?
 


Monday, December 7

GOD: LEIBNIZ vs VOLTAIRE
Is the concept of God useful at a time of crisis? We travel across time to imagine a debate on that question, between German philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz and French writer and philosopher Voltaire. The origin of this imagined debate was Leibnitz’s optimistic view, outlined in his book Theodicy, that God created the “best possible world,” and Voltaire’s subsequent critique of that view in his satirical play, Candide. The departure point for our imagined discussion: a devastating earthquake in 1755 Portugal. The end point: the Coronavirus pandemic.

Tuesday, December 8

URSULA FRANKLIN, PART TWO
Before iPads and Playstations, before AI medicine and laser weaponry, there was The Real World of Technology. In these acclaimed 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, the pioneering scientist and renowned humanitarian Ursula Franklin defines technology simply as “practice, the way we do things around here.” By reflecting deeply and clearly on how that practice has changed over time, she reveals much about the ways technology imposes itself on how we live and work.

In 1984, experimental physicist Ursula Franklin was the first woman to be given the title of ‘University Professor’ by the University of Toronto. Her legacy goes beyond her many contributions as a scientist. She’s also known for her major achievements as a humanitarian. (University of Toronto/Mark Neil Balson)


Wednesday, December 9

URSULA FRANKLIN, PART THREE
Before iPads and Playstations, before AI medicine and laser weaponry, there was The Real World of Technology. In these acclaimed 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, the pioneering scientist and renowned humanitarian Ursula Franklin defines technology simply as “practice, the way we do things around here.” By reflecting deeply and clearly on how that practice has changed over time, she reveals much about the ways technology imposes itself on how we live and work.

Thursday, December 10

A CONTINENT OF STORIES
Deborah Ahenkora
has long believed there’s a “book famine” throughout Africa. The most acute shortage is in books written by Africans for Africans — especially children’s books in which African children can see themselves reflected. So she decided to rewrite that history to ensure African stories are both told and read. This episode originally aired on February 5, 2020.

Friday, December 11

DANGEROUS KITCHEN, PART TWO
In 1992, producer Philip Coulter took a team to Los Angeles to interview the famous — and notorious — musician Frank Zappa for a series about ‘How Music Works.’ Zappa was very ill at the time (he died the following year), and there wasn’t enough in the interviews for the series as planned. Ten years later, Philip went back to LA to complete the project, interviewing musicians and others who had worked with Zappa, and to explore a different question — how did this prolific, iconoclastic and ever-inventive composer and musician actually go about creating his groundbreaking music?
 


Monday, December 14

THE DIRT ON HANDWASHING
The resistance Ignaz Semmelweis encountered to his life-saving ideas would ultimately lead to his tragic end. With handwashing in the midst of a renaissance in the coronavirus era, Semmelweis deserves at least some of the credit. *This episode originally aired on May 27, 2020.
 

Contrasting images of Ignaz Semmelweis illustrate the toll that institutional resistance to his associated efforts to combat puerperal infections took on him. He is seen on the left in 1857, age 39, as he began his campaign. On the right is a photo taken a mere three years later, upon completion of his work The Etiology, Concept, and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever. (University of Alabama Press)


 

Tuesday, December 15

RECONCILIATION, PART ONE
Any talk of post-conflict reconciliation quickly turns to Rwanda. Post-genocide, Rwandans have moved forward but arriving at a collective truth has meant accepting the relationship between truth and fact is not always clear and straightforward.

Wednesday, December 16

URSULA FRANKLIN, PART FOUR
Before iPads and Playstations, before AI medicine and laser weaponry, there was The Real World of Technology. In these acclaimed 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, the pioneering scientist and renowned humanitarian Ursula Franklin defines technology simply as “practice, the way we do things around here.” By reflecting deeply and clearly on how that practice has changed over time, she reveals much about the ways technology imposes itself on how we live and work.

Thursday, December 17

FIRESIDE & ICICLES: GATHERING POEMS FOR WINTER
Facing a colder-than-usual winter (in social terms if not temperature), Tom Howell seeks not to escape misery so much as exploit it, with the goal of achieving a certain delicious mix of loneliness, nostalgia, yearning, and elevated moaning known to Welsh poets as hiraeth. He digs through a pile of poetic works from ancient to new in search of the perfect works to evoke hiraeth in their own way. He enlists the help of poets as well as IDEAS‘ online community.

Musician and composer Frank Zappa in concert on Sept. 15, 1972. In his 30-year career, he released more than 60 albums with his band the Mothers of Invention, and as a solo artist (Evening Standard/Getty Images)

Friday, December 18

DANGEROUS KITCHEN, PART THREE
In 1992, producer Philip Coulter took a team to Los Angeles to interview the famous — and notorious — musician Frank Zappa for a series about ‘How Music Works.’ Zappa was very ill at the time (he died the following year), and there wasn’t enough in the interviews for the series as planned. Ten years later, Philip went back to LA to complete the project, interviewing musicians and others who had worked with Zappa, and to explore a different question — how did this prolific, iconoclastic and ever-inventive composer and musician actually go about creating his groundbreaking music?
 


Monday, December 21

JERRY GRANELLI: A LIFE IN THE MUSIC
A profile of the legendary jazz drummer and composer Jerry Granelli, on the eve of turning 80. He has accompanied many of the greats, including: Mose Allison, Sly Stone and The Grateful Dead. Opened for Lenny Bruce and taught alongside Allen Ginsberg. And most famously, he is the last surviving member of the Vince Guaraldi Trio that recorded the iconic album: A Charlie Brown Christmas

Tuesday, December 22

RECONCILIATION, PART TWO
In Bosnia, there are facts about the genocide but little acceptance of their truth by Serb aggressors. For Bosniaks, genocide denial means they are stuck in a violent past with little prospect for release.
 

IDEAS producer Matthew Lazin-Ryder explores the philosophical quandaries that come up during Christmas, such as: is it okay to lie to your kids so they believe in Santa? (Mauro Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images)


Wednesday, December 23

CHRISTMAS PHILOSOPHY 101
Heat the cocoa, stoke the fire, and settle in for some good ol’ fashioned philosophy! Christmas is a minefield of deep philosophical quandaries, like — is it ethically correct to lie to children? Who does a gift really benefit the giver, or receiver? How do we really know Santa exists, or doesn’t? Christmastime is full of moments that reveal deep questions, so join IDEAS on a dramatic journey through the philosophy of Christmas.
 

Thursday, December 24

PRE-EMPTED
 

Friday, December 25

PRE-EMPTED
 


Monday, December 28

HOW TO AVOID CONFLICT: LESSONS FROM 16TH CENTURY ITALIAN DUELS
It’s only when disputants are so ‘pig-headed’ as to not accept a sensible process of mediation that the duel takes place, according to York University PhD student and master fencer, Aaron Miedema. He’s digging through the cases of more than 300 duels from the 16th and 17th century to uncover highly evolved mediation processes designed to help disputants save face instead of having them disfigured by swords or pistols. The surprise: there are lessons for us from 500 years ago which may prove useful in today’s climate of public blaming and shaming. *This episode originally aired on April 23, 2020.

Tuesday, December 29

RECONCILIATION, PART THREE
Without justice, there can be no reconciliation and for Indigenous people in Canada, justice is tightly wrapped into the question of land. Is it possible to have a serious conversation about land when fundamental questions about land and nationhood remain unresolved?

Philosopher Justin E. H. Smith says irrationality is ‘reason’s twin,’ and has been equally vital to human development. (Submitted by Princeton University Press)

Wednesday, December 30

WHY TOO MUCH LOGIC LEADS TO IRRATIONALITY: JUSTIN E. H. SMITH
The Parisian-American philosopher Justin E. H. Smith speaks about the history of irrationality, and why it’s always been reason’s “twin.” He argues that attempts to impose the superiority of reason always lead to explosions of irrationality, whether in our individual lives, or in society at large.  *This episode originally aired on October 22, 2019

Thursday, December 31

PRE-EMPTED

Friday, January 1

NEW YEARS LEVEE
In a time-honoured IDEAS tradition, Nahlah Ayed hosts a New Year’s levee, giving us a taste of what to expect this coming year. We’ll hear from the show’s producers and contributors about everything from the cultural history of Black hair, to lessons on marketing a ‘green’ movement, to the revival of a controversial Canadian novel about a bear.
 

Source Article